Mostly Jewelry

tastefullyoffensive:

"My poor cat has it rough." -ExMachina70

tastefullyoffensive:

How to exit the back of a pickup truck. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

The steaks have never been higher. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

The steaks have never been higher. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

[@sallystrange]
Back to school selfie from yesterday. I hope everyone has a great semester!

Back to school selfie from yesterday. I hope everyone has a great semester!

gremlinowl:

Suzanne Williams

Evidence of my passion for jewelry emerged at the young age of 2 when I locked my mother out of the house to obtain unfettered access to her jewelry box.  For me, jewelry can express philosophies, ideas, and emotion.  Jewelry can be elegant, playful, daring, powerful, and fun.

I create 3D assemblages and shadowboxes containing graphic images that sometimes feature three-dimensional dioramas.  The work I create functions on a variety of levels that go beyond the piece itself. It can reflect the mood, attitude, and sometimes the beliefs of the wearer. It can be a catalyst for social interaction or create an impromptu visual vacation for the viewer. Whether the imagery I use is derived from nature, such as pine needles on a forest floor, the pattern of ice crystals across a pond, a grove of aspen trees, a powerful storm, or more urban themes such as a city reflected in a car bumper,  or a factory with smokestacks, my objective is to create a connection between myself, the wearer and the viewer.

I recently stumbled upon Suzanne Williams’s work, and was entranced immediately. (Even before I discovered the snail pendant!) I love the layering, the textures, the use of metal colors to create a scene that is almost nostalgic. The images are fairly simple, almost childlike, but are rendered cleanly and precisely, in a sophisticated way, accented by the framing of the diorama in bold, loosely geometric forms. And I absolutely love the way she integrates some of her bails into the piece, like the aspen necklace up top. 

gremlinowl:

Michelle Startzman 

My work is a reflection of myself and the relationships that I have formed throughout my life. I am interested in the constant current of people who come in and out of our lives, and the way that we build relationships through perception and understanding. First impressions are often wrong, and only by looking beyond layers, will a person’s true identity be revealed.

I construct forms that represent an unknown identity. With the use of photographs, layering and microscopic inspired forms, my work considers the complexity of relationships and the way that people relate to one another. The microscopic perspective encourages the viewer to take a close analytical look, while the portrait revealed underneath prompts interest in the unknown. 

The jewelry I create is intended to be worn on the body, which implies an intimate experience in which the wearer becomes physically and symbolically close to the identity represented in the piece. The sculptural forms are more reserved, keeping the identity separate from the viewer, yet there is a level of intimacy in the way that the viewer has to peer in closely to reveal what is inside. The camera lenses function as viewfinders that also magnify the imagery, further distorting the portrait underneath. 

The pieces are built with structural integrity, but with fragile materials such as glass that can easily be shattered if mistreated, much in the way that relationships can be damaged if not cared for. The aim of my work is to bring insight to the complexity of human relationships and the examination that is necessary to look beyond the surface to truly understand someone.

ufansius:

Silver-gilt and enamel bread and salt dish decorated with miniature enamel portraits of Tsar Alexander III at the top (second photo), Empress Maria Fedorovna to the right (third photo), and Tsarevich Nicholas to the left - Pavel Ovchinnikov, 1883.

Insane how real they look

tastefullyoffensive:

[channelate] (bonus panel)

cross-connect:

Brian Dettmer- a Decade of turning Book Surgery into Art

The richness and depth of the book is universally respected yet often undiscovered as the monopoly of the form and relevance of the information fades over time. The book’s intended function has decreased and the form remains linear in a non-linear world. By altering physical forms of information and shifting preconceived functions, new and unexpected roles emerge. This is the area I currently operate in. Through meticulous excavation or concise alteration I edit or dissect communicative objects or systems such as books, maps, tapes and other media. The medium’s role transforms. Its content is recontextualized and new meanings or interpretations emerge.